Get the facts before you decide.

Abortion is a medical procedure that terminates a pregnancy. This procedure affects your body, so you owe it to yourself to get complete and accurate medical information on how the procedure works and what it will do to you, before deciding if this option is right for you. You owe it to yourself to be to be fully informed.

If you are considering abortion, we can provide you with complete information before you make a decision about abortion. We do not provide for or refer for abortions.

We are a non-profit clinic that offers no-cost:
• Pregnancy Testing
• Ultrasound
• STD Testing
• Sexual Health Education
• Options education

Before you schedule an abortion, you must confirm that you are pregnant and that the pregnancy is in your uterus. If the pregnancy is outside the uterus (ectopic pregnancy) this can be a life-threatening condition and abortion will not treat this condition and you need medical attention. A pregnancy test will let you know for sure if you are pregnant and ultrasound confirms the pregnancy, checks if the pregnancy is in the uterus, and confirms exactly how far along you are in your pregnancy. Knowing how far along your pregnancy is will also let you know what abortion procedures could be potential options for you.

In addition to confirmation that your pregnancy in in your uterus, it is important to be screened and treated for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) prior to an abortion. Often, STDs don’t have signs you can see, but can make it hard for you to have a baby in the future. STDs can also affect your overall health. At Abria, we can provide you with free gonorrhea and chlamydia testing, which are the two most common STDs.

Counseling is also recommended before an abortion. Having a baby is a life-changing event, no matter where you are in life. Whatever decision you make regarding your pregnancy will impact your life. Getting the facts is a good place to start, but for such an important decision, it can be helpful to find a safe space to walk through your options to ensure that you are making the decision that fits with your values. Circumstances change, but your values direct your life no matter how old you are or where you are in your plan for your life. In the shock of discovering an expected pregnancy, abortion may seem like the best option, but it’s not the only one.

We are here to help you make a fully-informed decision about your pregnancy.

To learn more, call us at 651-695-0111 or book an appointment online instantly by clicking HERE.

We do not provide or refer for abortions or birth control.

Right to know
For your health and safety, Minnesota law requires that you receive certain information before an abortion. As part of the Women’s Right to Know Act, you must be informed of the particular medical risks associated with the abortion procedure you choose, the probable gestational age of the pregnancy at the time the abortion is to be performed, the medical risks associated with carrying a child to term, and the medical assistance benefits that may be available for prenatal care, childbirth, and information about neonatal care. This is for your health and safety. At Abria, we provide you with this information because we believe that an informed decision is an empowered decision.

For more information, visit the Woman’s right to Know page on the Minnesota Department of Health website.

Teens and abortion
Minnesota law allows minors (under 18 years of age), to receive many sexual health services without the consent of their parents. Minnesota law requires that both of your parents be told of your decision 48 hours before your abortion. A judge can excuse you from this requirement.

We encourage teens to be open with their parents, but also understand that telling parents about a pregnancy can be difficult for a number of reasons. Teens can receive all of Abria’s services without their parents having to be informed or giving consent. Since our services are provided at no cost to you and we do not bill insurance, all appointments are completely confidential. We are here to help you figure out your next steps and support you no matter your circumstances are.

Abortion Costs
Medication or abortion pill costs vary by provider, but typically range between $300 and $800, not including the costs of the required office visits. Surgical abortion costs start at approximately $300 in early pregnancy and can go up to as much as $3,000 in late pregnancy.

Abortion alternatives
Getting all the facts and exploring all of your options, including alternatives to abortion, will help you be empowered in your decision-making.

To learn more, call us at 651-695-0111 or book an appointment online instantly by clicking HERE.

We do not provide or refer for abortions or birth control.

The following is information from the Minnesota Department of Health about abortion:

Abortion Methods and Their Associated Medical Risks

If a woman has made an informed decision and chosen to have an abortion, she and her doctor must first determine how far her pregnancy has progressed. The stage of a woman’s pregnancy will directly affect the appropriateness or method of abortion. The doctor will use a different method for women at different stages of pregnancy. In order to determine the gestational age of the embryo or fetus, the doctor will perform a pelvic exam and/or an ultrasound.

Abortion Risks
At or prior to eight weeks after the first day of the last normal menstrual period is considered the safest time to have an abortion. The complication rate doubles with each two-week delay after that time. The risk of complications for the woman increases with advancing gestational age.
According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the risk of dying as a direct result of a legally induced abortion is less than one per 100,000. This risk increases with the length of pregnancy. For example:
• 1 death for every 530,000 abortions at 8 or fewer weeks
• 1 death per 17,000 at 16-20 weeks
• 1 death per 6,000 at 21 or more weeks
The risk of dying in childbirth is less than 1 in 10,000 births.
The risks or possible complications associated with an abortion are listed under each abortion procedure and are further described under the Medical Risks of Abortions and Long-Term Medical Risks sections of this booklet.

Methods Used Prior to Fourteen Weeks

Early Non-Surgical Abortion
• A drug is given that stops the hormones needed for the fetus to grow. In addition, it causes the placenta to separate from the uterus, ending the pregnancy.
• A second drug is given by mouth or placed in the vagina causing the uterus to contract and expel the fetus and placenta.
• A return visit to the doctor is required for follow up to make sure the abortion is completed.
Possible Complications
o incomplete abortion
o allergic reaction to the medications
o painful cramping
o nausea and/or vomiting
o diarrhea
o fever
o infection
o heavy bleeding

Vacuum Aspiration Abortion
• A local anesthetic is applied or injected into or near the cervix to prevent discomfort or pain.
• The opening of the cervix is gradually stretched with a series of dilators. The thickest dilator used is about the width of a fountain pen.
• A tube is inserted into the uterus and is attached to a suction system that will remove the fetus, placenta and membranes from the woman’s uterus.
• A follow up appointment should be made with the doctor.
Possible Complications
o incomplete abortion
o pelvic infection
o heavy bleeding
o torn cervix
o perforated uterus
o blood clots in uterus.

Dilation and Curettage Abortion
• A local anesthetic is applied or injected into or near the cervix to prevent discomfort or pain.
• The opening of the cervix is gradually stretched with a series of dilators.
• The thickest dilator used is about the width of a fountain pen.
• A spoon-like instrument (curette) is used to gently scrape the walls of the uterus to remove the fetus, placenta, and membranes.
• A follow up appointment should be made with the doctor.
Possible Complications
o incomplete abortion requiring vacuum aspiration
o pelvic infection
o heavy bleeding
o torn cervix
o perforated uterus
o blood clots in uterus.

Methods Used After Fourteen Weeks

Dilatation and Evacuation (D&E)
• Sponge-like tapered pieces of absorbent material are placed into the cervix. This material becomes moist and slowly opens the cervix. It will remain in place for several hours or overnight. A second or third application of the material may be necessary.
• Following dilation of the cervix, intravenous medications may be given to ease discomfort or pain and prevent infection.
• After a local or general anesthesia has been administered, the fetus and placenta are removed from the uterus with medical instruments such as forceps and suction curettage. Occasionally for removal, it may be necessary to dismember the fetus.
Possible Complications
o blood clots in the uterus
o heavy bleeding
o cut or torn cervix
o perforation of the wall of the uterus
o pelvic infection
o incomplete abortion
o anesthesia-related complications.

Labor Induction (Including Intra-Uterine Instillation)
• Labor induction may require a hospital stay.
• Medicine is placed in the cervix to soften and dilate it.
• There are three ways to start labor early:
• Medication is given directly into the bloodstream (vein) of the pregnant woman starting uterine contractions.
• Medication inserted into the vagina to start uterine contractions.
• Medication injected (instillation) directly into the amniotic sac by inserting a needle through the mother’s abdomen and into the amniotic sac (bag of waters). This stops the pregnancy and starts uterine contractions.
• Labor and delivery of the fetus during this period are similar to the experiences of childbirth.
• The duration of labor depends on the size of the baby and the contractility of the uterus.
• There is a small chance that a baby could live for a short period of time depending on the baby’s gestational age and health at the time of delivery.
Possible Complications
o If the placenta is not completely removed during labor induction, the doctor must open the cervix and use suction curettage (removal of uterine contents by low-pressure suction).
o Labor induction abortion carries the highest risk for problems, such as infection and heavy bleeding.
o When medicines are used to start labor, there is a risk of rupture of the uterus.
o As with childbirth, possible complications of labor induction include infection, heavy bleeding, stroke and high blood pressure.
o Other medical risks may include blood clots in the uterus, heavy bleeding, cut or torn cervix, perforation of the wall of the uterus, pelvic infection, incomplete abortion, anesthesia-related complications.

Hysterotomy (similar to a Caesarean Section)
• This method requires that the woman be admitted into a hospital.
• A hysterotomy may be performed if labor cannot be started by induction, or if the woman or her fetus is too sick to undergo labor.
• A hysterotomy is the removal of the fetus by surgically cutting open the abdomen and uterus.
• Anesthetic medication, given into the woman’s vein or back, or inhaled into the lungs, is administered so the woman will not feel the surgery.
Possible Complications
o Complications are similar to those seen with other abdominal surgeries and administration of anesthesia
o Severe infection (sepsis)
o Blood clots to the heart and brain (emboli)
o Stomach contents breathed into the lungs (aspiration pneumonia)
o Severe bleeding (hemorrhage)
o Injury to the urinary tract
o Blood clots in the uterus
o Heavy bleeding
o Pelvic infection
o Retention of pieces of the placenta
o Anesthesia related complications

Dilation and Extraction
• This method may be performed between 20 and 32 weeks gestation.
• Sponge-like tapered pieces of absorbent material are placed into the cervix. This material becomes moist and slowly opens in the cervix. It will remain in place for one to two days. A second or third application of the material may be necessary.
• After a local or general anesthesia has been administered, the fetus and placenta are removed from the uterus with medical instruments such as forceps, suction and curette (a spoon-like instrument). It may be necessary to dismember the fetus.
Possible Complications
o Risks are similar to childbirth
o Uterine infection
o Heavy bleeding
o High blood pressure
o Rare events such as blood clot, stroke or anesthesia-related death

Medical Risks of Abortion

The risk of complications for the woman increases with advancing gestational age (see above for a description of the abortion procedure that your doctor will be using and the specific risks listed in those pages).

Pelvic Infection (Sepsis): Bacteria (germs) from the vagina may enter the cervix and uterus and cause an infection. Antibiotics are used to treat an infection. In rare cases, a repeat suction, hospitalization or surgery may be needed. Infection rates are less than 1% for dilation and suction curettage/vacuum aspiration abortion, 1.5% for dilation and evacuation (D & E), and 5% for labor induction.

Incomplete Abortion: Fetal parts or other products of pregnancy may not be completely emptied from the uterus, requiring further medical procedures. Incomplete abortion may result in infection and bleeding. The reported rate of such complications is less than 1% after a dilation and evacuation (D & E); whereas, following a labor induction procedure, the rate may be as high as 36%.

Blood Clots in the Uterus: Blood clots that cause severe cramping occur in about 1% of all abortions. The clots usually are removed by a repeat dilation and suction curettage.

Heavy Bleeding (Hemorrhage): Some amount of bleeding is common following an abortion. Heavy bleeding (hemorrhaging) is not common and may be treated by repeat suction, medication or, rarely, surgery. Ask the doctor to explain heavy bleeding and what to do if it occurs.

Cut or Torn Cervix: The opening of the uterus (cervix) may be torn while it is being stretched open to allow medical instruments to pass through and into the uterus. This happens in less than 1% of first trimester abortions.

Perforation of the Uterus Wall: A medical instrument may go through the wall of the uterus. The reported rate is 1 out of every 1000 with early abortions and 3 out of every 1000 with dilation and evacuation (D & E). Depending on the severity, perforation can lead to infection, heavy bleeding or both. Surgery may be required to repair the uterine tissue, and in the most severe cases hysterectomy may be required.

Anesthesia-Related Complications: As with other surgical procedures, anesthesia increases the risk of complications associated with abortion. The reported risks of anesthesia-related complications is around 1 per 5,000 abortions. Most are allergic reactions producing fever, rash and discomfort.

Long-Term Medical Risks
Future childbearing: Early abortions that are not complicated by infection do not cause infertility or make it more difficult to carry a later pregnancy to term. Complications associated with an abortion may make it difficult to become pregnant in the future or carry a pregnancy to term.

Cancer of the Breast: In March 2003 the National Cancer Institute (NCI) released a consensus report finding no link between abortion and breast cancer. An additional report issued in March 2004 by a cancer research group at Oxford University also indicated there is no link between abortion and breast cancer.

Women who have a strong family history of cancer or who have clinical findings of breast disease should seek medical advice from a physician regardless of their decision to become pregnant or have an abortion.

Medical Emergencies
When a medical emergency requires the performance of an abortion, the physician shall tell the woman, before the abortion if possible, of the medical indications supporting the physician’s judgment that an abortion is necessary to avert her death or that a 24-hour delay will create serious risk of substantial and permanent impairment of a major bodily function.

Fetal Pain
Some experts have concluded the unborn child feels physical pain after 20 weeks gestation. Other experts have concluded pain is felt later in gestational development. This issue may need further study.

The Emotional Side of Abortion
Each woman having an abortion may experience different emotions before and after the procedure. Women often have both positive and negative feelings after having an abortion. Some women say that these feelings go away quickly, while others say they last for a length of time. These feelings may include emptiness and guilt as well as sadness. A woman may question whether she made the right decision. Some women may feel relief about their decision and that the procedure is over. Other women may feel anger at having to make the choice. Women who experience sadness, guilt or difficulty after the procedure may be those women who were forced into the decision by a partner or family member, or who have had serious psychiatric counseling before the procedure or who were uncertain of their decision.

Counseling or support before and after your abortion is very important. If family help and support is not available to the woman, the feelings that appear after an abortion may be harder to adjust to. Talking with a professional and objective counselor before having an abortion can help a woman better understand her decision and the feelings she may experience after the procedure. If counseling is available to the woman, these feelings may be easier to handle.
Remember, it is your right and the doctor’s responsibility to fully inform you prior to the procedures. Be encouraged to ask all of your questions.

The Medical Risks of Childbirth

Labor is the process in which a woman’s uterus contracts and pushes, or delivers, the fetus from her body. The fetus may be delivered through the woman’s vagina, or by caesarean section.
A woman choosing to carry a child to full term (40 menstrual weeks, 38 weeks after fertilization) can usually expect to experience a safe and healthy process. For a woman’s best health, she should visit her physician before becoming pregnant, early in her pregnancy, and at regular intervals throughout her pregnancy.
POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
• Uterine infection – 10% may develop during or after delivery, and on rare occasions cause death
• Blood pressure problems – 1 in 20 pregnant women have during or after pregnancy, especially first pregnancies
• Blood loss – 1 in 20 women experience during delivery
• Rare events such as blood clot, stroke or anesthesia – related death
• Women with severe chronic diseases are at greater risk of developing complications during pregnancy, labor and delivery.
• Risk of dying as the result of a pregnancy complication is 12 per 100,000 women.